On Meaning

Posted: September 13th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Apple makes it mean something to you. Microsoft makes it mean something to themselves.

Apple says what you want to hear. Microsoft says what they want to say.


On Starting A Company

Posted: September 5th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: hustle | No Comments »

When I interviewed Mark Zuckerberg at Startup School, he said that while it was a lot of work creating course lists for each school, doing that made students feel the site was their natural home.

Word for word, this (long) Paul Graham post might be the best read on starting companies. Even if he doesn’t always explain himself well ;)


of the people, by the people, for the people

Posted: August 29th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

Key to any worthwhile public relations effort, Mr. Werner believes, is getting to facts about what people actually think about an organization, product or cause. “They are ingredients which are far more important to an organization’s standing with the public than all of the tactical stunts of publicity that stick out and create attention as a program.

“The north star of your course should be other people’s opinions. Walk across the street and look at your store as other people see it. Instead of thinking about a broad, hazy public, think rather in terms of the many different publics your organization meets and serves, their differing needs, likes and dislikes.

“Good public relations thinking – two-way thinking – digs up the reasons why the public feels as it does about a business.”

http://badpitch.blogspot.com/2011/08/pr-time-capsule-can-take-you-back-to.html


What is up with the Nickelodeon Kids’ Choice Awards?

Posted: August 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: culture | No Comments »

So this happened…

and a few years ago, this happened…

Celebrities really like giving good advice to kids. Maybe they should give advice to adults too.


Russell Brand

Posted: June 25th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: art, culture | No Comments »

Reminds me of


You make poor decisions

Posted: June 18th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: hustle, ideas | No Comments »

Here’s a talk from Charlie Munger. He’s Warren Buffett’s very close business partner who Warren would never have been as successful without. I’ve read and listened to a lot of what he’s written and said. He is extremely smart in that he’s able to notice things other people might now, and he’s also well-educated so that he has a lot of raw material to work with.

Watch this and take to heart what he says.

And here’s a summary of it thanks to The Motley Fool.

Also, here’s something that strikes me as relevant, probably due to the use of incentives, and the fact that it’s a good example of systems thinking, and Charlie would like it:

In 1986, new federal legislation, the Toxic Release Inventory, required U.S. companies to report all hazardous air pollutants emitted from each of their factories each year. Through the Freedom of Information Act, that information became a matter of public record. In July 1988, the first data on chemical emissions became available. The reported emissions were not illegal, but they didn’t look very good when they were published in local papers by enterprising reporters, who had a tendency to make lists of “the top ten local polluters.” That’s all that happened. There were no lawsuits, no required reductions, no fines, no penalties. But within two years chemical emissions nationwide had decreased by 40 percent. Some companies were launching policies to bring their emissions down by 90 percent, just because of the release of previously withheld information. — Thinking in Systems, Donella Meadows


The more software you have, the more software you need.

Posted: April 24th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: coding | No Comments »

Jevons Paradox says that as a resource can be used more efficiently, more of it ends up being used overall. That is, the better the deal you’re getting, the more you’re interested in buying.

This example of real-world compounding reminded me of another example: software. There’s an interesting quirk about software — the more you have of it, the more you need.

Let’s trace through one recent path of the software industry. We start with a website.

A website is a great idea. Websites (code) make it easy to distribute information. There’s so much information that people create dynamic websites (more code).

Dynamic websites are useful, but once you’ve got dynamic data, you want the data available via API (even more code) so that outside developers can build applications (lots more code).

To help with this, you build an API management layer (tons more code), which produces information about all these other applications.

You want that data combined in a dashboard (still even more code) alongside data from all of the other software that relates to your business (which is even more code than all of the other code so far).

Whew.

Anything that cannot go on forever must stop. But there doesn’t seem to be any reasonable end in sight. This is one small piece of the software industry that points to a bigger trend, which seems to contradict common sense. People intuitively understand supply and demand. But here, supply creates more demand.

It’s a good time to be a programmer.


Claude Lorrain – Seaport at Sunset

Posted: March 29th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Uncategorized | No Comments »

I’ve always liked this picture.

http://www.art.com/products/p17389995503-sa-i7043798/claude-lorrain-port-de-mer-au-soleil-couchant-sea-port-with-setting-sun-1639.htm


Ramble on

Posted: March 7th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: culture, ideas | No Comments »

Life is but a dream and I’m sitting all alone
Looking for the day when I’ll, make it home
Make it on my own, so I’m off to roam
Another place’s past, Paris, London, and Rome
Old blue eyes, that’s what I’m'nna be
Cuz I did it all alone, me is my team
Can’t escape the past, so I’m betting on my future
Cuz today’s wasted and tomorrow’s such a creature
Like you never seen, idea, or a dream
Gotta skim along, searching for the cream
Of the crop, of wheat, of fields of gold
When the sky parts open, and you’re standing all alone
Your people done left cuz they ain’t right
And the sky done broke, and you’re empty, and the night
Is all that remains, and the pulse in your ears
Beats in your head, drumming up your fears
Gonna beat this how? Dunno
Tin for a heart, and on my back, clothes
Not rags, not riches, something in-between
As I look back on what I’ve never been
If it was all a dream, then I hope I never wake, but I’m
Shooting for tomorrow, tryin’a kill yesterday
Tryin’a kill father time, I must be crazy
Facing my future, tomorrow’s just a baby
And it’s time for a change, something kinda smells
Thoughts clearer now, ringing of a bell
I won’t look back, salt for regret
Heavy is my heart, not tin but lead
Can’t stand not to fly, won’t get dragged down
And in my lead safe I know that I will
Ramble on.

June 3, 2012


The Difference Between the Janitor and the Vice President

Posted: October 30th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: hustle | No Comments »

[He] imagines his garbage regularly not being emptied in his office, and when he asks the janitor why, he gets an excuse: The locks have been changed, and the janitor doesn’t have a key. This is an acceptable excuse coming from someone who empties trash bins for a living. The janitor gets to explain why something went wrong. Senior people do not. “When you’re the janitor,” [he] has repeatedly told incoming VPs, “reasons matter.” He continues: “Somewhere between the janitor and the CEO, reasons stop mattering.” That “Rubicon,” he has said, “is crossed when you become a VP.”

source